Monthly Archives: July 2016

Meet The Model: Pixie Sidesaddle Event Horse

This week, we’re continuing our Meet The Model series, in which we introduce our customers to the many different breeds who show off our tack at its finest on our website.

With her sweet blue eyes, it’s easy to see why Pixie became a tack model. The AQHA-registered 14-year-old goes by Shy Lopin Asset in the show ring, where she and her human Samantha are used to turning heads. They event–sidesaddle!

150 Solid HUNT BRIDLE Pixie-black

Pixie shows off her hunt bridle

“I want to bring back sidesaddle riding as an accepted form of riding in a variety of disciplines,” said Samantha.

Samantha and Pixie found each other six years ago through Craigslist. Samantha learned to ride when she was young and fell out of it for several years. Pixie is her very first horse, and Samantha has been taking full advantage of Pixie’s smarts and versatility. Together, they’ve experimented in jumping, barrel racing, and driving, and are taking on the eventing world.

Samantha said her biggest challenge with Pixie is teaching her to be a “good equine citizen” despite being a bit of a green rider still herself. It sounds to us like they’re off to a great start–they took home a ribbon at their first event while riding aside against astride competitors!

Their next goal is to move up to the Beginner Novice level, and we wish them lots of luck.

In this shot, Pixie is modeling our hunt bridle, which comes in 3/4″-width beta biothane with a 1-inch wide cavesson. It’s fully adjustable at the cheeks, bit ends, throatlatch, and noseband. Available in your choice of 14 colors! Want one of your own? Pick it up today–they start at $60!

 

Dressage for a cause!

We really enjoyed these photos from customer Robin Scarborough, who took her horse to an upper level classical freestyle class at the recent Potomac Valley Dressage Association Ride For Life. Robin and her horse used our bridle, long lines, and breastcollar at their show, and went with a nice bling option over a white base. We think it looks great on a dark bay!

The PVDA Ride for Life is a benefit event for the Johns Hopkins Breast Center, and has raised over $580,000 in its 12 years so far, according to its website. Two Horse Tack is proud to outfit Robin in her efforts, and we think the pair looks fantastic!

 

Robin3 Robin2 Robin1

11 States In 33 Days On Horseback? No Problem!

We were excited to get this note from Lindsay, one of our loyal customers and a trail/endurance rider. Lindsay and her horse hit the road this summer with her parents and her husband. The trip took 33 days and spanned over 5,000 miles!

Mow and I travelled around the country this spring and were so thankful to have our Two Horse Tack bridle, reins, and breastcollar along for the journey.  We drove 5,674 miles and rode in 11 different states.  I had plenty of things to worry about on this long trip but my tack was definitely not one of them!  Rain or shine, heat or cold, this tack is amazing.  Mow never had a rub mark, the beta biothane is so easy to clean, and the super grip on the reins is extremely soft on my hands.  Thank you Two Horse Tack for helping make my adventure a success!”

Sounds like the vacation of a lifetime to us.

Lindsay is part of the Green Bean Endurance program, which is an online education and support community for endurance riders of all levels. As you can see below, Lindsay and Mow are kitted out in bright green beta biothane that’s from our special Green Bean line of tack. Our tack line is designed for endurance and trail riders, who need their gear to be light but strong and able to stand up to all types of weather. Check it out here.

Hitting the trail in Kansas

Hitting the trail in Kansas

Lindsay on the road in Kentucky

Lindsay on the road in Kentucky

Mow and Lindsay in Missouri

Mow and Lindsay in Missouri

A beautiful scene in Oklahoma

A beautiful scene in Oklahoma

Two Horse Tack in the wide open reaches of Texas

Two Horse Tack in the wide open reaches of Texas

Careful on that Utah cliff, guys!

Careful on that Utah cliff, guys!

All smiles in Arkansas

All smiles in Arkansas

One more beautiful view for Mow and Lindsay in Colorado

One more beautiful view for Mow and Lindsay in Colorado

Countdown to summer vacation!

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Our tack makers here at Two Horse Tack are taking their first vacation in five years! While that’s great news for them, it means that you need to get your order in ASAP for quick delivery.

Order by July 18 to assure delivery before the shop closes July 20. We’ll be back and hand-stitching away on August 4!

Don’t forget to enter our monthly tack giveaway for a $5 off coupon code for your July order!

What’s that? Explaining lunge lines

For those of us who grew up riding in the English disciplines, lunge lines (or “longe lines” depending upon your spelling preference) are pretty commonplace. But for many trail or Western riders, the lines and their usefulness may be a little foreign.

lunge lineLunge lines are typically 20 – 30 feet long (though we offer them in a range of lengths from 10 to 40 feet) with a snap at one end and either a rubber stopper or hand loop on the other. Horses can be taught to circle their handler at the end of the lunge line while wearing either a halter or bridle at various gaits and can even jump small items that are open on the sides. Some people use lunging to allow a horse to get out feisty behavior like bolting, diving, and bucking on a windy day or after a long layoff, which can be useful ahead of a horse show performance or a ride at home. Others use lunging to help bring a horse back up to fitness without the weight of a rider, or can even to help scope out whether a horse is lame. (Often lamenesses are emphasized as the horse moves around a curve.)

Depending upon how you use the lunge line, you may prefer a lunging cavesson with loops around the noseband. This gives you options for where to clip or weave the lunge line. (Our lunging cavesson can be added underneath any bridle and is made from durable beta biothane.) lunging cavesson

No matter how you use a lunge line, it’s important to choose a length that’s safe for what you’re doing. A stiff or lame horse may benefit from a longer line that allows him to make a larger circle around the handler. Also keep in mind that you should switch directions to avoid placing too much stress on left or right front legs. One more consideration–don’t lunge too long. Stress injuries are caused by repeated force in one spot, and continuous turning in a circle can create that kind of stress after large number of repetitions.

Wondering how to teach your horse to work on a lunge line? Equusite has a great step-by-step troubleshooting guide to help. One thing that we’ve found helpful: vocal cues that help the horse learn what kind of transition you want from him. Those cues can also help you break through barriers under saddle.

Want to get started with your own lunge line? We offer lunging cavessons and lunge lines in a variety of colors of water-proof, dust-proof beta biothane at our online shop.