Blog Archives

From trailer to trail with just a few snaps!

We were happy to hear from Sarah and her horse Paige, who recently reviewed our quick change halter bridle. The traditional halter bridle allows you to swap between halter and bridle with just a couple snaps.

Our traditional halter bridle is great for trail riders because it helps them go from trailer to trail, but Sarah and Paige reminded us its versatility is also great during the trail ride itself.

I’m enjoying the halter aspect of the bridle for other reasons though. Twice now when on our trail rides we’ve had to dismount and hand walk because of the terrain. Both times I unhooked my reins from the bit and attached them to the halter lest I accidentally drag on her mouth.

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See the rest of Sarah’s review at her blog, A Soft Spot For Stars.

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OTTB Proud: Meet Our Ambassadors

We love hearing about off-track Thoroughbreds enjoying their new careers, so of course we’re proud to welcome Camile and her OTTB Gentry into our new ambassador program! Camile met Whitehouse Ridge, aka “Gentry” after exercising him for a friend and now shows the 11-year-old in hunter/jumper and dressage.

Camile and Gentry recently got one of our quick change halter bridles to make it easier for them to switch from one part of their training day to the next.

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Q: I remember you said you exercised Gentry for a friend before buying him; what was it about him that made you decide you wanted to work with him yourself?
This first time I had actually met Gentry was on a “field trip” with our 4H team. It was my first year judging and we had traveled out to my current friends place to set up a couple of classes. He was skinny, ugly looking thing that she had been giving time to recoop from his past life. At the time I had no interest in him. It wasn’t until another 2 YEARS later that I went out and visited their place again, this time helping Leeanne’s step daughter (my team captain) with grooming  the ponies. The night before I had found G’s sale ad and fell in love with his movement. (I actually didn’t even know it was the same horse.) This happened to be  the day that somebody was coming and looking at him for  their kid and Leeanne had me work him a little after they left. Fortunately for me, they didn’t like his big movement and declined the sale offer. Later that week, I received a call from her asking if I would like to work him for her, until he sold, for a limited pay. I started working him, with my parents telling me that we weren’t buying the horse, and all of us starting falling for him. He was just so sweet, with his big brown eyes and cowlick of a mane and he always seemed to know what to do even though he was  green. He was so forgiving if you messed up. Before we moved him, mom got on him and she hasn’t ridden in a while, and he took care of her by simply standing there and refusing to move. It was a funny yet kind act. That is what sold us.

Q:What’s your favorite part of Gentry’s personality?
He always tries his best, he gives his whole heart to me. Gentry is just that kind of guy that puts 110% ever time and it makes me  so happy  that I know that he will always try no matter what.

Q:What are your goals for this showing season, and what types of training challenges are you working on?
This year we are focusing on getting his confidence up in the show ring. I plan on showing him in 2ft h/s and eq o/f. Some of our challenges….oh my. Where to begin. You just never seem to be ready for shows. XD Headset is defiantly a struggle as well as keeping the true bend and relaxing  through and over the bridle.

Q:What is it about Two Horse Tack products you and Gentry love?
We love the durability and quality we get out of your products. Gentry is a bit of a mud lover, so it is always nice to have  the tack that will stand up to  his messy habits.

Q:How do you anticipate the quick change halter bridle will be helpful in your workouts?
This will help us in our workouts because I go on a lot of trail rides to build his topline and this product will help us stay clean and look good J Plus, they are malleable and soft on his face.

Follow their journey on their Instagram page, https://www.instagram.com/ottb.gentry/

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Congratulations to Gaia!

Congratulations to Gaia, winner of our recent tack giveaway with the Behind the Bit blog! We love meeting our followers on social media, and readers in the blogosphere. Gaia is a 2-year-old Tennessee Walking Horse who has been hand-raised by her human, Susan. Gaia was a dystocia foal, meaning her delivery was complicated; in Gaia’s case, her dam suffered a fractured pelvis, which meant that she couldn’t take care of Gaia. Susan tells us Gaia didn’t have to be bottle fed but actually drank milk out of a Tupperware container.

Meet Gaia, the Tennessee Walking Horse

Meet Gaia, the Tennessee Walking Horse

Because of Gaia’s age, she’s not ready to begin working under saddle yet, but will be starting ground driving soon and her people hope to use her new bitless bridle in her early training.

Susan tells us that because of the way Gaia grew up, she’s very people-oriented; sort of a “pocket pony” whose personality should help her excel at whatever she does. We’re expecting big things from this little girl!

Gaia will get a great start with our two-in-one bitless bridle, which converts between a cross-under bitless bridle and a sidepull. The cross-under style works with more generalized pressure than the sidepull, which focuses pressure on the horse’s nose. Many of our customers find that the bitless bridle gives them both extra control and a better sense of connectivity with their horse. The flexibility of the two-in-one makes it a great option for those trying a bitless bridle for the first time.

A study of our halter bridles

If you’re trying to decide between our two varieties of halter bridles, our four-legged friend Sue has a few suggestions for you. Sue was kind enough to model both our traditional halter bridle and our quick change halter bridle. Both options obviously switch between bridles and halters, but they do so differently.

Traditional halter bridle

Traditional halter bridle

Here we see the bit out of Sue's mouth with one bit hanger attached. Couldn't be simpler!

Here we see the bit out of Sue’s mouth with one bit hanger attached. Couldn’t be simpler!

The purple and black halter bridle is our traditional variety, which has bit hangers which clip onto the cheekpieces. As Sue is showing us, it takes a couple of quick seconds to switch between turnout and trail ride. This style, as the name implies, does have a more traditional look (it comes in single-color varieties as well, in addition to bling and reflective varieties).

Quick change halter bridle, which is three-in-one

Quick change halter bridle, which is really a three-in-one!

The orange item that Sue is wearing is the quick-change style halter bridle. Just unsnap the browband and lift the headstall and bit off the horse. As you can see, you’re left with a Western headstall and a turnout halter. When the pieces fit together, you have a halter bridle. The quick change style comes in all the same color, bling, reflective, and even camo options as the traditional style.

The quick change option is great for Western riders because it includes the headstall, but ultimately it comes down to which style works best for you and your horse. We can assure you that both are great, and equally maintenance-free! Just wash any of our beta pieces in soap and water to get them looking as good as new, no conditioner required.

Congratulations to Ayrk!

We recently completed a tack giveaway for Behind the Bit, which is a fantastic source for dressage riders to find event coverage, product reviews, and horsey fun of all sorts.

We gave away a two-tone English bridle, which is made from 3/4-inch beta with a 1/2-inch overlay. Our range of colors allows customers to be as bold or as traditional as they want; our winners decided to do a black base with a purple overlay–a nice mix of the conventional and the colorful!

Meet Ayrk, the Norwegian Fjord

Meet Ayrk, the Norwegian Fjord

The winners of the giveaway are Gemma and Ayrk. Ayrk is an 18-year-old Norwegian Fjord. The Norwegian Fjord is closely related to the Przewalski’s horse, and as you can see it’s known for its distinctive coloring and “rocker boy” mane. The Norwegian Fjord is a descendant of Mongolian wild horses and is considered an endangered breed.

Ayrk and Gemma have been working together for four years. They came together through a friend of Gemma’s riding instructor, and are currently learning about dressage. They also jump from time to time, as well. Ayrk is a huge fan of fruit–strawberries and tangerines being a particular favorite. We’ve heard of horses eating bananas and of course apples, but tangerines are a new one for us.

Enjoy your bridle, Ayrk and Gemma!

We're loving Ayrk's rocker boy mane!

We’re loving Ayrk’s rocker boy mane!

A new kind of tack giveaway

Love our monthly tack giveawaysHalter bridle with bit hangers? We’ve just made them a little sweeter.

Our shop has so many different color combinations of each item, and we want to help customers experience all of them. From now on, we’ll feature one of the varieties of the item up for giveaway–this week, it’s a traditional halter bridle in a two-color combination variety. Any two colors you want! There are dozens of possible options. Explore them! 

Also, we know that sometimes you fall in love with a giveaway item and you’d rather not wait to see if you win it. We totally understand! That’s why we’re offering $10 off the giveaway item in our shop for the duration of the giveaway. 

Meet Our Breeds: Solitaire and Commanche the Appaloosas

This week in our Meet Our Breeds series, we introduce you to Solitaire and Commanche, our Appaloosa models.

The Appaloosa is a breed based on a coat pattern. The breed was originally developed by the Nez Perce people of the Pacific Northwest. The tribe lost most of its horses in war, threatening the breed’s future until it was revived in the 1930s.

Commanche

Commanche

Today, the Appaloosa is the state horse of Idaho. The breed’s body type is influenced by Thoroughbred, Quarter Horse, and Arabian blood. Solid horses may be included in the registry if they can be blood typed to verify Appaloosa parentage.

In addition to their unique coat colors, most Appaloosas have striped hooves, mottled skin, or white sclera around their eyes. More than 700,000 Appaloosas have been registered with the Appaloosa Horse Club since its foundation in 1938.

Solitaire

Solitaire

We are lucky enough to have two Appaloosa models on our website. Solitaire is one of the many fantastic equine teachers in the Asbury University’s equine program. Asbury offers undergraduate degrees in equine science, and also has its own riding program.

Commanche hails from Easy Riders Ranch in Georgetown, Ky. He is one of nine horses who provide riding lessons, riding by the hour, and rides at birthday parties.

Congratulations to Ruby!

ruby headshotCongratulations to Ruby (aka Winteruby) and her owner Cerella, winners of our February tack giveaway!

Ruby and Cerella have been working together for three years, two of which they’ve spent eventing in the beginner novice level, a great accomplishment since Ruby was very green when they started.

Ruby also does hunter/jumpers and dressage (training level). She loves giving rides to kids.

Cerella tells us that Ruby’s ninth birthday is coming up in March, so their prize will be a sort of early present. Ruby will be getting our beta biothane English bridle, which is a perfect fit for her and ruby body shotCerella. Ruby is working to conquer her fear of water, and a beta bridle is just the thing. Beta is waterproof, so Ruby can splash all she likes without her bridle drying or cracking.

Learn more about our English bridle here.

Meet Our Breeds: Jack the Mule

You’ve probably read that we make tack for all disciplines and all breeds–we probably should say that we work with more than one species, too.

Jack is hard at work

Jack is hard at work posing for the camera

Meet Jack, the model for our mule bridle.

Mules are the offspring of a male donkey and a female horse, and their body build seems to largely depend on that of their dam. Contrary to popular belief, not all mules are incapable of reproducing–while mule stallions are infertile, there have been limited cases of female mules becoming pregnant and delivering foals.

Mules are an ancient creature, having been bred in Egypt at least as early as 3000 B.C. Because of their structure and toughness, they have long been used as draft or pack animals in various cultures and made several appearances in the Bible, and later proliferating in Asia and Europe throughout history. Mules made landfall in America along with Christopher Columbus and came to Mexico a decade after the fall of the Aztecs. Here, they have proven excellent farm animals in addition to their use as pulling or pack creatures. Mules have marched into war and pulled commercial freight.

Today, mules excel at a variety of disciplines under saddle, including roping, trail riding, barrel racing, driving, cutting, and racing.

Many mule owners report that mules are highly intelligent, sensitive, and quick to learn. They are often praised for their common sense and quiet temperament in new situations, and contrary to the old adage, are not inherently stubborn.

Jack is one of the equids in Asbury University’s equine studies program in nearby Wilmore, Ky. The college’s program offers majors in equine management and equine facilitated therapies.

Your turn: what do you love best about your mule?

Who wants a free bridle?

487357_182072481924342_803353413_nIt’s time for our February tack giveaway. This month we’re giving away our English bridle to one lucky entrant. This bridle comes in 3/4-inch beta biothane with a one-piece removable noseband that threads through the cheekpiece. It converts easily into a Western bridle.

Like all our beta pieces, our beta English bridle won’t crack, mold, or fade no matter the weather, and can be cleaned with soap and water.

So, what’re you waiting for? Enter on our website today. Even if you don’t win, you’ll get a $5 coupon just for entering.