Rein and bridle hardware: Here’s what you need to know

There’s no question we provide a wide variety of bit end options when you’re ordering a bridle or set of reins. Once in a while, we’ll get questions about the styles of hardware we offer on the bit ends of our bridle headstalls or the bit ends of our reins.

The photos below give a good demonstration of your options. All our tack comes standard with stainless steel hardware, which is guaranteed not to rust, although you can request brass hardware.

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Many people are familiar with the scissor snaps and quick change snaps, both of which makes for easy on and off if you have to switch equipment frequently. Roller buckles have a rolling piece around the bottom that keeps the strap moving through the buckle as you fasten and unfasten.

Conway buckles are designed to be easy to work with, too, although people may be less familiar with them. To adjust, pull the strap to the desired spot through both sides of the buckle and tighten to drop the hole onto the prong. Pull both ends to tighten, or push them together to loosen. See a video here.

Chicago screws and leather ties are popular with our Western riders and provide a solid, reliable attachment. They can be easily turned with a screwdriver into the slot. Just make sure you tighten them every now and then for safety, and never glue them!

Leather ties provide a traditional look for Western riders, as well as being an extra safety feature. Also called water loops, the ties are attached to one side of each rein and are looped through the ring of the bit and tied back to the rein. Besides their aesthetic value, the ties also provide a breakaway option if a horse steps on the rein, so the tie will snap instead of doing damage to the rein. Quarter Horse News has a great article with instructions on the different type of knots you can use to tie these.

Christmas ordering deadlines for our international customers!

The holiday shopping rush is upon us, and already we’re getting questions about deadlines to place orders in time for Christmas delivery. Here in the United States, your tack order needs to be in Dec. 21 to guarantee it arrives at your doorstep in time to make it under the tree.

If you live outside the United States, the deadlines are different. We ship our products using the U.S. Postal Service, so we’re subject to their outlines for estimated delivery times. Take a look at the order deadlines for your country below. Note, this is the time your order needs to be in so our tack makers can construct your items and get them to the post office in time.

For delivery to Central and South America, place your order by December 7

For delivery to Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Carribbean, Mexico, Europe and the Middle East, place your order by December 12

For Canadian delivery, place your order by December 14

Don’t forget to include measurements of your horse’s current tack in the Order Notes section if you’re requesting a custom size or if you think your horse may fall between sizes.

Domestic customers: remember that now through Christmas, all orders are automatically upgraded to rush shipping at NO additional charge. What better reason to start shopping?

Just in time for Christmas–FREE upgrade to rush shipping!

Still putting off your Christmas shopping? Yeah, we are too. Luckily, if you’ve got horse people on your list, you’ve still got time to make sure you can get them a great piece of custom, colorful tack well ahead of Christmas.

Starting this week, we’re offering a free upgrade to rush shipping for the price of standard! (Normally, you have the choice between 3-9 day priority shipping and rush, which gets your order to your door in 2-6 days.) No promo code required, and the upgrade is automatic.

Still need some time to mull it over? No problem. Our tack typically ships 1-2 days after you place your order and in most cases, will arrive on rush within 2-3 days. Pretty quick for custom work, right? Shop now!

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Don’t miss our Black Friday deals!

The turkey has been cooked, the pumpkin pie eaten, and it’s time to get Christmas shopping.

This weekend only (Friday through Monday), get a free t-shirt with this gorgeous design, courtesy of Summer Frost Designs, with a purchase of $125 or more. Use promo code BFRIDAY16. Or, purchase the tee separately for $25.

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(The watermark will not appear on the actual t-shirt.)

Enter code BFRIDAY16 at checkout, and the t-shirt will pop up in your cart. Click “Edit” to specify style and size. Please note, shirts will ship separately from tack, but no worries: it will be at your door in plenty of time for Christmas.

Also this weekend, get $5 off a purchase of $50 or more with promo code 5OFF50. Got your eye on a new tack set? This is the time to get it! But don’t wait–these promo codes expire at midnight on Tuesday.

Make sure you don’t miss a single sale by signing up for our newsletter here.

What’s that? Explaining lunge lines

(also known as longe lines, depending upon your sense of phonetic spelling)

 

If you grew up riding in the English style, you are probably familiar with the lunge line, but if you came to horses through trail riding or Western disciplines, it may be something of a foreign concept.

Lunging sends horses in a circle around their handler, who holds the excess line and sometimes a lunge whip. The whip does not typically touch the horse, but is carried in the right hand, trailing behind the horse to create noise that lets the horse know he needs to keep moving.

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Lunging horses has lots of different applications; it can be a controlled setting to work a horse lightly back from an injury, or provide a chance for someone on the ground to watch a horse at work to look for lameness. Lunging is also a way of letting a horse blow off some steam before beginning a ride, and it can also be a good way to help a horse build condition or muscle (especially if you’re also using side reins or other equipment). We’ve also found it a good way to teach horses voice commands, which can transfer nicely to other groundwork or riding.

Many English riders also begin their riding instruction riding a lunged horse, because it enables them to focus on their legs and position before they need to worry about also directing the horse around the arena.

No matter how you use lunging, there are a few important things to remember. If you’re lunging for more than a couple of minutes, it’s considered good practice to send the horse in both directions before finishing up for the day. That’s because turning in a circle unevenly stretches and loads the two sides of a horse’s body. It’s also important not to lunge too often or for too long at a time to avoid stress-related injury. Another good way to avoid putting too much strain on the horse is to avoid making the circle he travels in too small. Circles measuring 20-30 meters in diameter are considered a good size.

While lunging your horse, don’t wrap the line around your hand. If the horse should spook, you’ll end up losing some skin on your palms. Instead, loop excess line and grab the loop around the center.

Two Horse Tack offers all the equipment you need to get your horse lunging. Our lunge lines come in lengths from 10 to 40 feet in your choice of 14 colors. Our lunging cavesson includes hardware sewn into the noseband, giving you all kinds of options for line placement. Cavessons are available in sizes mini to draft, in matching colors to our lines.

Shop now!

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New Product Alert: Stylish Nylon Turnout Halters

Want to make your horse’s turnout a little more glamorous? We’ve got you covered.

We’ve just added biothane glitter turnout halters to our shop! This halter is perfect for everyday use because biothane is industry tested for strength, even in the most rugged conditions. It’s also waterproof and fade-proof—just dunk in a bucket of soapy water after the horse has taken a roll in the mud and air dry.

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Our glitter biothane halters are here!

The glitter biothane halter is adjustable at the nose and crown and comes with reinforced holes.

Our glitter biothane halter is available in your choice of five colors (light blue, dark blue, green, purple) and no-rust stainless steel hardware comes standard.

Order yours today!

Note: At this time the glitter biothane halter is only available in horse size. Sorry for any inconvenience!

New Product Alert: Jumping Breastcollar

Attention eventers, jumpers, and foxhunters: we’ve got a new product in our shop for you!

Our new jumping breastcollar gives you the security and safety of a regular breastcollar while allowing for freedom of movement through the shoulders. (If you aren’t familiar with the safety benefits of a breastcollar, check out this post from our archives.)

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The jumping breastcollar runs over the top of the neck and attaches at the saddle billets. That neck strap gives you something to grab onto if your horse decides to perform an unscheduled “gravity check.”

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Fully adjustable at the shoulder and billets, this breastcollar is available in your choice of colors: black, white, brown, light blue, dark blue, hunter green, lime green, purple, yellow, orange, red, wine, turquoise, and pink.

Click here to learn more and order now.

Congratulations to Heather and Fiona!

Congratulations to Heather and Fiona, who are the winners of our October tack giveaway!

Fiona is a 10-year-old pinto Spotted Draft x Arabian cross mare, and Heather is her human. Heather hails from northern Maryland and is currently a veterinary technician. Together, the two have dabbled in a variety of disciplines, from dressage to trail riding, and beyond. Heather has competed in driving, dressage, and Western disciplines.

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Doesn’t she look great? Love that face!

We know they’ll love our reflective split ear Western bridle, which will be made to their size and color specifications. All our items with reflective Day-Glo overlays become especially popular this time of year as the days get shorter and more folks are riding in low light.

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In the month of November, we’ll be giving away a camouflage Western breastcollar. This breastcollar will help keep your saddle in place, which is great from a safety perspective, and also gives you a great spot to hang on in the event of ‘unexpected turbulence’ during your ride. Our camo breastcollar comes in 3/4-inch width beta biothane in your choice of 14 colors with green, pink, or orange camo. It’s fully adjustable at the shoulder and belly straps to ensure a great fit.

Sound cute? Enter for your chance to win one today and you’ll get a coupon code for $5 off your next order.

Great Idea! Easy Hardware Replacement

Anyone who has horses realizes that they’re mischievous creatures, seemingly bound and determined to destroy tack, blankets, stall guards, wraps, bell boots, and sometimes even themselves. Although Two Horse Tack’s beta biothane halters, bridles, and breastcollars are super-durable, horses do occasionally manage to snap or exhaust hardware on our pieces.

For just this reason, we wanted to make sure it was easy for customers who chose snap ends for their reins to replace those snaps if they should break. That’s why we thread our snaps through the reins and buckle the reins together, rather than threading them through and stitching them down. We can replace hardware in tack which is stitched down (email us if you need a repair!) but it takes longer and can be slightly more expensive than replacing the snap yourself.

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As shown here, you simply need to undo Conway buckles (if you’re not familiar with Conway buckles, see this tutorial here), thread on the new hardware, and rebuckle. Simple, right? Now finding that lost bell boot/blanket strap/fly mask is a whole other venture…

Seedlings ‘In The Pod’

rowynbickinggreenbeanseedlinginthepodWe got this fantastic note from Jacke Reynolds of Green Bean Endurance about one of our youngest customers, Rowyn, who just got a pony bridle as part of our giveaways with Green Bean. We work closely with Green Bean to meet the needs of upcoming endurance riders, and even designed a line of tack specifically for them. Green Bean is a group designed to educate and assist new endurance riders:

Rowyn rides in our “Seedling” division.  In seedling we have “in the pod” riders and “out of the pod” riders.  Rowyn is in the pod, meaning she is learning about endurance riding, taking riding lessons, crewing, clinics, or intro rides.  This year Rowyn sprouted her way to an intro ride and completed on her pony.  She has earned 165 points in the seedling division.  Rowyn is a great example of how our children can learn responsibility and achieve measurable goals in endurance riding.   She looks forward to riding in her new official Green Bean Endurance bridle from Two Horse Tack.
Thanks Natasha and crew for planting the seeds that make these kids grow ♥
Jacke Reynolds
Co-Director, Green Bean Endurance
Keep at it, Rowyn!